• Todd Engle

Soil pressure can crush foundation walls


The weight and pressure of the dry soil may affect and crack a foundation. There is wet soil that can exert a force against a foundation. The force is greater than dry soil force against the foundation, because of the hydrostatic pressure forces. The wet soil may crack a foundation and cause moisture intrusion and water penetration through the foundation and may enter the structure, building, house, basement, or crawlspace. Look for actively wet, damp, or dry watermarks or indications or evidence of water intrusion problems at the crack or below the crack. There is frozen soil that can exert a force against a foundation. The force is even greater than the wet soil force against the foundation because water expands as it freezes. The frozen soil may crack a foundation and cause moisture intrusion problems when the frozen water eventually melts. These soil forces are largely dependent upon the geographical location of the structure and the climate zones and weather conditions. That's why home inspectors are not responsible for future weather events or future structural problems, since conditions can change incredibly at any time during the life of the structural system. A home inspection is just a snap-shot in time. A home inspector is responsible for only those defects the inspector both observed during the inspection and also deemed to be a material defect, as defined by the InterNACHI Home Inspection Standards of Practice at www.nachi.org/sop.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Vents